# Monday, October 29, 2007
                 

Halloween Safety Tips

Children across Canada will be flocking to the streets in a few short days for trick-or-treating. Especially for younger children, the excitement of the holiday can make it easy to forget safety tips and measures. Parents therefore need to exercise caution and make sure that their children have a safe and happy Halloween.

It is recommended that parents accompany children under 10. If your child is over 10, and will not be accompanied by a parent, ensure that they are going out in a group. Map out a route that the group should follow, so that you know where they are going to be. Try and stick to a neighborhood that you know well. Give your child your cell phone so they can call in case of emergency. Tell your child to only go to houses that are lit up; and to never enter someone's home.

Check the weather forecast and make sure your child is dressed appropriately. As masks can impair vision, try and use makeup instead. Make sure the costume fits your child properly; long costumes can cause them to trip. Also ensure that the costume isn't made of a flammable material. Brightly colored costumes make your child more visible to motorists. Costumes should be comfortable and allow your child to move easily.

If you plan on handing out treats, make sure your porch and yard are well-lit. Clear your walkway and sidewalks for things such as wet leaves that children can slip and fall on. If you use candles in your jack-o-lantern, make sure it is placed out of reach of children. Keep your pets locked in a separate room; the constant doorbell and stream of people can upset a normally docile animal. If possible, avoid handing out candy that has common allergens, such as peanuts. If your child has food allergies make sure he/she knows what is allowed and what isn't. Make sure to tell trick-or-treaters not to eat their candy before they have gone home and had their parents inspect it.

It's important to remember that children can easily get caught up in the excitement of the night, and can forget simple rules. Talk to your child about why the rules are important, such as crossing streets only at intersections, so they have a better understanding. If possible, have a few adults from your neighborhood take out a group of kids. Have a safe and happy Halloween!

posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 1:54:46 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Monday, October 15, 2007
                 

Anti-Inflammatory Removed From Canadian Market

Prexige, an anti-inflammatory prescription medication will no longer be sold in Canada. The drug has primarily been prescribed to adults who have exhibited the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. Health Canada has canceled the medication's market authorization after receiving additional safety information. Further testing has shown a potential for serious liver problems.

Prexige has been on the market in Canada since November 2006. It has a maximum dose of 100 mg. daily. However, Australia pulled Prexige from their market this year following reports of serious adverse liver problems stemming from doses of 200 mg and 400 mg per day. Upon reviewing the additional safety information, Health Canada has concluded that it is not possible to safely and effectively manage this risk even with 100 mg daily. Currently 2 cases of liver-related problems have been reported in Canada since the drug's approval, and 4 cases have been reported worldwide.

While the vast majority of prescription drugs are safe to use (under a physician's direction) occasionally Health Canada must recall a product. It is important to remember that all medicines carry some risk. When starting a new prescription and/or over-the-counter medication, be aware of any changes that may occur and discuss them with your physician and/or pharmacist. It is possible to have adverse affects from a medication when you mix it with other medications, vitamins, foods and/or beverages. Read and follow the instructions for the prescription carefully. Ask your pharmacist for written information and/or directions regarding your medication.

For people who are currently on prescription medication(s), the following tips may prove to be useful:

• Ask your doctor why you are being prescribed this medication. Have an understanding of why you need this medication, and how it works. Some medications require check-ups and/or tests. Ask about the possible side effects, what to expect and how long it should take to start working. Tell your physician about all other medications, supplements, vitamins, etc. in order to prevent a possible adverse reaction.
• Use the same pharmacist. By doing this, one pharmacy will have your records and be aware of your medications. This will allow your pharmacist to monitor your prescriptions and make you aware of any possible harmful interactions.
• Keep a record of all medications you take. In case of emergency, have a current list of all prescriptions, over the counter medications, vitamins, supplements and herbal remedies you take. This information can be invaluable to a physician in the event of an emergency. It is also important for your physician and pharmacist to have this information.
• Safely store your medication. Read and follow the instructions on how to store your medication. Never combine different pills in one container, as you may not remember the instructions for each one.

If you have any questions about prescription recalls, go to the Health Canada website for further information.

posted on Monday, October 15, 2007 4:57:38 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
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