# Friday, October 5, 2012
                 
Canada is the second largest country in the world, and offers countless attractions for visitors to Canada to see. From the west coast of British Columbia that has the beautiful Rocky Mountains, to the east coast with the Bay of Fundy and the largest tides in the world. Here are some great places to see if you are visiting Canada.
posted on Friday, October 5, 2012 3:56:50 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Monday, September 24, 2012
                 
Getting a chronic disease can be a debilitating and catastrophic experience that not only affects the sufferer but also family members. Just some chronic disease prevention tips are: quit smoking; eat a healthy diet; get regular physical exercise; lose any excess weight; and avoid excessive alcohol consumption.
posted on Monday, September 24, 2012 10:17:01 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Wednesday, September 5, 2012
                 
Canada to a large extent has become an "instant gratification" society, much to the detriment of our eating habits. Fast food such as greasy hamburgers and fries are the norm. So is frozen packaged foods that we pop into a microwave for a quick and easy meal. The downside to this is that many of us no longer eat healthy. The repercussions are enormous: our immune systems are weakened, leaving us susceptible to colds and the flu. The chances of contracting some health ailment are also vastly increased, as is a premature death.
posted on Wednesday, September 5, 2012 9:41:21 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Tuesday, August 21, 2012
                 
Use these 5 tips to avoid hassles when it comes to travel health insurance. Too often we hear about stories where people run into difficulties while traveling, many times not understanding what they are actually covered for. Most importantly, get the advice of an experienced travel insurance broker or agent (this article lists important questions that you should ask them).
posted on Tuesday, August 21, 2012 10:14:35 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Monday, August 13, 2012
                 
Visitors to Canada insurance offers protection against unforeseen medical emergencies while traveling, studying or working in Canada. This blog article offers several great tips that will help keep costs down and also help to avoid complications with VTC coverage while in Canada.
posted on Monday, August 13, 2012 6:46:22 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Tuesday, July 24, 2012
                 
This blog article discusses diabetes: what it is; various ways to treat it; and purchasing a health insurance plan to cover the costs of testing kits, glucose monitoring equipment and other durable medical supplies.
posted on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 7:01:52 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Thursday, July 5, 2012
                 
We all know that uninsured hospital stays can be expensive, but how much does a stay in a Canadian hospital actually cost? This information is especially important for visitors who are not covered for unexpected medical expenses while traveling in Canada. Accidents can happen, as do unexpected illnesses and other emergency situations such as heart attacks, etc.
posted on Thursday, July 5, 2012 5:11:04 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Thursday, June 21, 2012
                 
We are very happy to announce the launch of a new group insurance product from Wawanesa Life called Diversity. Companies that have 3 to 9 employees can now get instant Diversity quotes online. No more going back and forth with a broker regarding employee information. No more waiting for your quotes for weeks on end.
posted on Thursday, June 21, 2012 4:17:20 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Friday, June 15, 2012
                 
When travelling abroad or coming to Canada it is important to know how pregnancy-related issues are covered (or not covered) by travel insurance. It is often assumed that both a pregnant mother and the expectant child can be covered, but often this is not the case.
posted on Friday, June 15, 2012 6:56:01 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Tuesday, March 13, 2012
                 
Do you have a parent or grandparent that would like to visit Canada? If you do then you should know as of December 1, 2011, Immigration Canada is now offering parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens (permanent residents) the option of getting a Canadian "super visa". Unlike traditional visas this Canadian super visa is: valid for 2 years; renewable up to a total of 10 years; and allows for multiple entries into Canada. Within this two year period the applicant does not have to apply for a new visa every time they enter Canada!
posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 5:42:47 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Friday, January 21, 2011
                 
very month or so, the main stream media picks up on a story about a Canadian traveling without proper coverage. Many of these unfortunate situations arise from a misunderstanding on the part of the client. Clients find out too late that their pre-existing condition is not covered by the policy they purchased. This is devastating since the client took the time and had the foresight to purchase coverage for their trip. This prudent move can be compromised quickly if pre-existing conditions apply.
posted on Friday, January 21, 2011 9:44:38 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Friday, December 17, 2010
                 
If you are thinking about buying health insurance and have pre-existing conditions it is important that you speak with a HealthQuotes.ca advisor. In many cases families will have members that use medication regularly while other family members have no pre-existing conditions.
posted on Friday, December 17, 2010 8:37:48 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Wednesday, December 8, 2010
                 
It is widely known and well proven that employees who feel like their employer cares about their future and retirement are happier and more productive members of the workforce. Probably the most direct and profound measure of this is the retirement plan. Pensions and Group RRSP’s have and continue to be the cornerstone of industry for attracting and retaining a quality workforce. Still only 38% of working Canadians are members of a group retirement savings plan because small business think it is too complicated or expensive to be involved in a Pension or Group Savings plan.
posted on Wednesday, December 8, 2010 1:25:23 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Tuesday, October 19, 2010
                 
HealthQuotes.ca has developed several key strategies for dealing with benefits for the Canadian arms of both large America companies and multinational firms.
posted on Tuesday, October 19, 2010 1:10:44 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Tuesday, October 5, 2010
                 
My name is Ian Baker. I am the president of HealthQuotes.ca. HealthQuotes.ca is Canada’s premier insurance quoting web site. Our site was launched in 1997 and has been a great success story. Our model has always been ...
posted on Tuesday, October 5, 2010 2:38:39 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Wednesday, September 15, 2010
                 
Medical expenses can be a huge and unexpected financial burden for Canadians. One day you are healthy and the next day you find out you may have a health issue. You may not have adequate coverage when a change occurs. Your benefits or individual plan may have gaps or restrictions that leave you vulnerable.
posted on Wednesday, September 15, 2010 1:51:35 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Wednesday, May 26, 2010
                 
As of May 1, 2010, the Government of Cuba has declared that all travellers must be insured by a valid medical insurance policy prior to entering the country. This requirement applies to foreigners, Cubans living abroad, and foreign citizens who temporarily or occasionally reside in Cuba.

The Travel Health Insurance Association of Canada (THIA) has confirmed that Cuban authorities will accept either a Provincial Health Insurance card or proof of private travel insurance coverage to meet this requirement. Lacking either of these documents, visitors will be obliged to purchase insurance from a Cuban carrier upon arrival.

Travellers should carry the following documentation in compliance with the new requirements:
  • Valid Canadian passport
  • Cuban Tourist Card or Visa
  • Provincial Health Insurance card
    • Each family member should have their own
    • Should not be relied upon as the only form of medical coverage, as provincial health insurance is extremely limited in terms of out of country coverage and does not pay up front as required by Cuban authorities (Note: you will not be allowed to exit the country with outstanding medical expenses)
  • Certificate of travel insurance coverage
    • Must include visible policy number and insurer name
    • It is recommended that this notice lists all covered dependents as well
  • Copy of covered expenses
Travellers are urged to contact their insurance carriers to confirm that their benefit plan is recognized by ASISTUR, the official insurance and assistance entity in Cuba. Those who are covered through their employers should do the same.

HealthQuotes.ca has received confirmation that two of Canada’s leading insurers – Standard Life and Sun Life Financial – have made the necessary arrangements with Cuban authorities. Both Europ Assistance (the travel provider of Sun Life Financial) and AXA Assistance (the travel provider of Standard Life) are recognized by ASISTUR.

We are confident that all other major insurers will follow.

For more information, please visit:
Note that travel insurance can be obtained through the HealthQuotes.ca website, or by calling a licensed advisor at 1-800-474-4474.

posted on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 1:21:39 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Wednesday, April 28, 2010
                 
Recent layoffs at the Nova Scotia office that processes permanent residency cards and citizenship applications are expected to cause delays for immigrants to Canada who are planning to travel abroad this summer.

The Canadian Employment and Immigration Union reports that the contracts of approximately 147 administrative staff have ended and will not be renewed. As a result, the waiting time to process essential legal documentation may increase from 18 to 24 months, affecting the travel plans of immigrants who intend to visit family members outside of Canada.

Permanent residents who expect to travel are advised to review the expiry dates on their permanent residency cards and ensure that they will cover the duration of the trip, as valid documentation is required both to exit and enter the country. In the event that an extension is required, residents are urged to be prepared for a longer than usual processing period and adjust their travel plans accordingly.

Conversely, a representative from federal immigration insists that the layoffs will not cause substantial delays since the additional employees were hired to assist with a backlog to begin with.

Nonetheless, we remind readers to ensure that all travel documents are in place well ahead of time. In addition, travellers are encouraged to arrange for adequate travel insurance coverage prior to departure.

Travel insurance is an essential aspect of your trip. Accidents can happen anywhere, any time, and the peace of mind of having financial security will ensure that you enjoy a safe and pleasant holiday.

We offer a variety of comprehensive options from leading insurers and there are important differences with respect to the coverage available. One of our trained advisors will be glad to assist you in comparing and contrasting the numerous options to find a travel medical plan that best suits your needs.

Please visit www.healthquotes.ca for all of your travel insurance requirements. You can also call us toll-free at 1-800-474-4474 for a free travel consultation.

posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 1:58:46 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Saturday, March 13, 2010
                 
Although factors such as family history and age cannot be altered, many of the health concerns that can cause cardiovascular disease are controllable. Every Canadian can make the choice to improve their health status, and thus, improve their chances over not becoming ill. In order to lessen the chances of heart disease and/or stroke the following is recommended:
 
  • Control Blood Pressure: The single most important stroke risk factor that is controllable; a 10 point drop in blood pressure equals a 40% less chance of having a stroke.
  • Quitting Smoking: Smoking can increase the risk of stroke as much as 2 to 3 times. Quitting can diminish this risk within the first year of cessation; after 5 years of successful abstinence from smoking the risk is diminished to a person that has never smoked before. For non-smokers, it is essential to avoid second- hand smoke which can double the risk of cardiac disease/stroke.
  • Control Cholesterol: The link between high levels of bad cholesterol, LDL and heart disease are stronger than the connection between bad cholesterol levels and stroke. LDL, however, causes hardening of the arteries, which in turn increases the risk of stroke. Keeping cholesterol in a healthy range will usually require being physically active, maintaining a healthy weight, as well as taking any medications prescribed.
  • Exercise: Regular physical activity can be a major factor in reducing the risk of stroke. The right type and amount of exercise can often cut the possibility of having a stroke by half. As well, exercise can lead to other healthy changes.
  • Getting and Maintaining a Healthy Weight: Excessive body weight definitely raises the risk of having a stroke. Healthy eating, along with regular physical exercise, is essential for cardiovascular health. A properly balanced nutritious diet helps to lower body weight and the size of the waist/ The Body Mass Index (BMI) level is good indicator of whether or not the ideal body weight has been reached. High BMI levels for women are to be considered at a high risk of stroke; high BMI coupled with a large waist in males is considered particularly high risk.
  • Normal Blood Sugar Levels: Almost 20% of people who have had a stroke are diabetic. In turn, diabetics have a higher risk of stroke due to that over time; high levels of blood sugar can damage the blood vessels that lead to the brain. Diabetics must manage their disease with extreme care in order to reduce the risk of stroke.
  • Control Atrial Fibrillation: Atrial fibrillation is a heart rhythm disorder that can increase the chance of the formation of blood clots, which can lead to a stroke. It is important to take the medication that is prescribed for this condition.
This and the past 2 blogs have dealt with cardiovascular disease and stroke. As with most other health conditions, a healthy diet and lifestyle is absolutely essential for optimal health. Please remember to notify your health (and life) insurance broker if and when your health status is upgraded due to a healthier lifestyle; you may be entitled to lower insurance premiums.

posted on Saturday, March 13, 2010 2:59:36 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Friday, February 26, 2010
                 
Ischemic heart disease is the most common type of cardiovascular disease and affects men and women both equally. While factors such as age and/or heredity to contribute to the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, the majority of cases found in Canadians were related to risk factors that are modifiable. The major risk factors for cardiovascular disease are:

  • Smoking: Smoking greatly increases the risk of the development of blocked arteries, blood clots, reduction of oxygen in the blood as well as increased blood pressure. Smoking, either first and/or second hand are harmful to human health in general, and specifically is high-risk for developing ischemic heart disease and stroke. Non-smokers can die just as prematurely from second-hand smoke; smoking nearly doubles the risk of stroke as well. Quitting smoking not only provides immediate but also long lasting health benefits; within hours of smoking cessation the risk of heart attack already begins to decrease.
  • Lack of Exercise: People who are physically inactive have twice the risk of having heart disease as well as a stroke. More than half of the Canadian population reports to being inactive; for those who have already experienced a heart attack, it is vital to have and maintain a healthy level of exercise in order to increase chances of survival.
  • Unhealthy Eating: 56% of Canadians report eating less than 5 servings of fresh fruit and vegetables per day, with the minority only reporting that they eat fresh fruit and vegetables in the amounts recommended in Canada's Food Guide. Not only do fresh fruits and vegetables protect the heart and blood vessels, but they provide fiber and contain anti-oxidants (substances which work against the development of blockage in the arteries).
  • High Cholesterol: Cholesterol is one of the fats in the blood that contributes to the growth of all cells in the body. Too much cholesterol ca lead to blockage of the arteries. There are 2 main types of cholesterol:
    1. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is most often referred to as "bad cholesterol" because it's high levels contribute to artery blockage.
    2. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is most often referred to as "good cholesterol" because it helps to carry LDL-cholesterol away from the artery walls.
  • Triglycerides are not a type of cholesterol but they are, however, a type of fat thatis found in the blood and are linked with excess weight, excessive alcohol consumption and/or diabetes.
  • High Blood Pressure (Hypertension): This is the measure of the force (pressure) of blood against the walls of the blood vessels (arteries). The top number of a blood pressure reading represents the pressure when the heart contracts and pushes blood out (systolic) and the bottom number is the lowest pressure when the heart relaxes between beats (diastolic). Blood pressure that is consistently more than 140/90 mmHg is considered high, although for those people who have diabetes, 130/80 mmHg is considered high. High blood pressure can, over an extended period of time, cause scarring that promotes the build-up of fatty plaque which is a substance that can narrow and eventually block the arteries. Fatty plaque also causes strain to the heart, initially causing a thickening of the heart muscle and eventually causing the heart to weaken. Very high blood pressure can cause blood vessels in the brain to burst, resulting in a stroke. While high blood pressure is one of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, it is also the number one modifiable risk factors for strokes. More than 2.6 million Canadians have been diagnosed with hypertension; there is a possibility that just as many people are living with hypertension and are simply not aware of it. It is expected that more than 90% of people 55-65 with normal blood pressure are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetime. In 2007 21 million Canadians visited community physicians due to high blood pressure; blood pressure medication that is prescribed by a physician has also risen. Approximately 2.3 billion dollars a year are spent on direct costs of high blood pressure.
  • Sodium: While the human body does require some sodium in order to function in a healthy manner, too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure, which in turn is a major risk for strokes, heart disease, and/or kidney disease.
  • Obesity/Overweight: Being significantly overweight and/or obese increases the risk of developing a wide range of serious health issues, including heart disease, Type 2 diabetes as well as high blood pressure.
  • Stress: High levels of stress and/or prolonged stress may manifest itself in a physical sense, causing high cholesterol, increased blood pressure, and/or disturbances in heart rhythm. These conditions can all increase the risk of developing heart disease. As well, for some people, living with high levels of stress may cause them to not get enough rest, a proper diet, regular physical exercise etc. which in turn are all factors that can elevate the risks of heart disease.
  • Diabetes: Diabetes occurs when insulin does not control the level of sugar in the body, either because not enough insulin is produced or because the body does not react properly to the insulin that is produced. Insulin is then required to break down sugar in the body. Diabetes increases the risk of high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and strokes, particularly for those whose sugar levels are poorly controlled. Diabetes can result in poor circulation caused by damage to the blood vessels.
The third and final blog in this series will provide information on how to lower the risks of cardiovascular disease as well as the current treatment methods; this blog will be available within the next 10-14 days.
 

posted on Friday, February 26, 2010 4:58:13 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
RSS 2.0