# Wednesday, March 20, 2019
                 
It is not uncommon for a Canadian to have private health insurance coverage from more than one plan. If this is the case then the question arises: which plan pays out for eligible expenses first and which plan pays out second? The answer to this is a process called "coordination of health insurance benefits". Read on for more information and helpful tips!
posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 6:27:41 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Thursday, February 28, 2019
                 
Have you ever wondered what sort of coverage is actually offered via private health insurance plans in Canada? In this article we take a look at the types of coverage that private health and dental insurance plans offer, as well as how these coverages relate to public Canadian healthcare plans. There are also links to more detailed articles about specific types of coverage for those people who really want to dive into the realm of private Canadian health insurance!
posted on Thursday, February 28, 2019 4:11:58 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Monday, January 14, 2019
                 
Durable medical equipment such as wheelchairs, crutches and canes oftentimes plays a critical role when recovering from an accident or debilitating illness. However, these medical devices can be very expensive to buy or even rent, and many Canadians (mistakenly) believe that their public healthcare plan will cover these costs. This is where private health insurance such as employee benefits and individual health insurance comes into play! Read on to find out more.
posted on Monday, January 14, 2019 2:53:08 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Thursday, August 23, 2018
                 
Physiotherapy often plays a crucial role when recovering from a debilitating accident or illness. And in many cases, physiotherapy costs are not covered by your provincial healthcare plan. Read on to find out how much coverage for physiotherapy can be obtained via Canadian health insurance plans (employee benefits and individual health and dental).
posted on Thursday, August 23, 2018 3:57:11 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Wednesday, October 4, 2017
                 
There are many foreign workers currently residing and working in Canada at any given time. But what happens if a non-Canadian worker gets sick or has an accident that requires medical attention while here in Canada? Well, turns out that all foreign workers (including family members) who have a valid Work Permit will be eligible for provincial healthcare coverage. For more details please read on!
posted on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:09:20 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Thursday, January 26, 2017
                 
In this article we examine what the phrase "health insurance" actually means. We first highlight the difference between government-managed healthcare systems and private health insurance. We then compare and contrast the two types of health insurance available to Canadians: employee benefits and individual health insurance plans.
posted on Thursday, January 26, 2017 6:50:33 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Friday, June 17, 2016
                 
We often hear about Canada's "free" single-payer healthcare system. However, Canada's healthcare system is not free, it is paid for by a wide variety of federal and provincial Canadian taxes. And this gives rise to the question: "how much does the healthcare system actually cost Canadians"? Well, read on to find out!
posted on Friday, June 17, 2016 8:48:37 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Tuesday, March 18, 2014
                 
Please use these health insurance tips if you are considering getting Canadian private health insurance coverage. We have been brokers for health insurance for over 33 years: leverage our knowledge and experience!
posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:33:43 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Monday, February 10, 2014
                 
The Canadian healthcare system has been receiving extra scrutiny since the USA launched the Affordable Care Act. But how does the Canadian healthcare system actually work? Read on for a concise, easy-to-follow summary of the Canadian single payer healthcare system.
posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 8:22:19 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
# Tuesday, June 11, 2013
                 
This blog article discusses immigration to Canada from a healthcare perspective. Canadian healthcare differs from province to province, and new immigrants should apply for provincial healthcare immediately upon arrival!
posted on Tuesday, June 11, 2013 9:06:33 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Monday, October 22, 2012
                 
Refugees that are not government sponsored no longer get any health benefits. On the one hand, these refugees, often with questionable backgrounds, were gettng better healthcare than Canadians were getting. On the other hand, refugees that cannot afford prescription drugs for life threatening ailments will die, while medication that could save their life is sitting on a shelf a short distance away.
posted on Monday, October 22, 2012 7:54:22 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)  #   
# Wednesday, February 20, 2008
                 

Seniors And Rising Prescription Costs

All Canadian seniors 65 and older are 'supposedly' covered by a provincial drug plan. However, new research shows that out of pocket costs paid by seniors for their prescriptions greatly varies between the provinces. Canadians in 2007 spent $26.9 billion dollars on prescription medication; out of that amount over $4 billion was directly out of pocket. This discrepancy in coverage means that some Canadian seniors are not able to afford much needed prescription medications.

Take, for example, a 65 year old woman on a government pension who suffers from diabetes and high blood pressure and needs 4 prescription medications in order to control her condition. If this woman lives in Ontario her out of pocket expense is eight dollars; if she lives in Manitoba she will have to pay five hundred and three dollars. A 73 year old man who needs five different medications to treat his heart failure will spend 60 dollars in New Brunswick; in Manitoba this expense soars to one thousand, three hundred and thirty two dollars.

These costs are based largely on age, level of income, marital status and your province of residence. It is estimated that the number of Canadians who are eligible for prescription reimbursement varies from 9% in Manitoba to 43% in Quebec; this can also depend on which jurisdiction the person resides in.

The income bracket of a Canadian senior can determine the amount of prescription reimbursement that they are entitled to. New Brunswick and P.E.I. are the most comprehensive provinces, offering seniors either full coverage or paying up to 35% of prescription costs, regardless of income. Ontario and Nova Scotia's reimbursement plans are based on income level. Seniors living in Quebec generally pay more for prescription costs, although there is some relief for low-income as well as those who require long-term and extensive drug treatment. When it comes to Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Newfoundland, seniors will only be covered if they qualify as having a low income status.

Most seniors lose their drug coverage which they had through employee benefits at a time when they need it most. For seniors who are living on a fixed income, these prescription costs may not be affordable, thereby putting their health in jeopardy. For most seniors, prescription coverage is essential in order to make sure that if health problems do occur, they have the means to afford the medication.

A new study has been conducted by SunLife Financial to assess how many Canadian seniors have actually saved money to cover their healthcare costs. They found that only 9% of working Canadians have actually factored in healthcare costs when calculating their retirement savings. 80% of Canadians expect these costs to be covered by their provincial health care program. 65% of Canadians say that they do realize they will have to spend some of their retirement savings on healthcare expenses, but only 37% of this group said they have actually saved for it. 36% of Canadians are under the impression that their employee benefits will provide them with health coverage in their retirement years. And while those who say they are aware that they will need to save money for healthcare costs, the majority admits that they do not know exactly how much this will cost them.

Healthcare related costs need to be correctly assessed when planning retirement. If not, many Canadians may be running the risk of not being able to afford treatments, prescriptions, etc. when it is most needed. For those who have employee benefits, it is important to thoroughly understand what, if any, coverage will be provided upon retirement. It is not feasible to rely on provincial coverage to cover all your costs; private health insurance will more than likely be a much cheaper solution.

Canadian seniors who are retiring and losing their benefits may want to consider purchasing FollowMe coverage. There is no medical exam required if applied for within 60 days of the termination date of the employee benefits coverage. For those whose group insurance expired and it is longer than 60 days, or for those who didn’t have employee benefits, guaranteed issue health insurance is available. You will have your choice of plans depending on your needs, and acceptance is automatic with no medical questionnaire.  As prescription costs can be expensive, as well as subject to being raised, health insurance premiums offer several advantages. For those on a fixed income, the cost can be budgeted for, with a set amount having to be paid. This can be financially more feasible than trying to second-guess how much needs to be saved in the event of having to suddenly require medications. Health insurance will also cover other expenses, such as vision care costs, hospital benefits and dental coverage. Having health coverage will provide the security of knowing your hard earned savings will not be spent on having to cover these expenses, or the uncertainty of not being able to afford treatment.

posted on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 12:04:58 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #   
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