# Thursday, October 22, 2009
                 

As the previous article stated, there are several types of laser eye surgery: PRK, Lasik and Lasek procedures.

LASIK usually has less post-operative pain, and there is a greater risk of complication due to the cornea being cut into. This includes:

  • Mild to significant dry eyes, which can affect vision;
  • Poor quality of night vision due to halos and glare, thus affecting the ability to drive safely at night;
  • Corneal ectasia, a serious condition caused by the weakening and bulging of the cornea. Severe cases of this condition can require a corneal transplant or implant.

Both the LASIK and PRK procedures carry the risk of corneal infection, known as infectious keratitis. This infection can result in a significant loss of vision. LASEK surgery reduces the risks such as weakening of the eye and dry eyes. As with any other surgical procedure, complication risks are increased for people with certain health conditions and/or lifestyles. When contemplating eye laser surgery, have a detailed consultation with the surgeon about:

  • Your medical history and current health conditions. Make sure the surgeon is made aware of such conditions (yours and family history) as lupus, diabetes, keloid formation and any eye diseases, i.e. herpes simplex, glaucoma, dry eyes, eyelid infections, and/or previous eye surgeries.
  • Your current lifestyle. For people who engage regularly in sports, where it is likely to be hit in the face, after LASIK there is a risk that the flap could dislocate. This risk remains for years after the laser surgery.
  • Your career plans. Certain occupations (i.e. pilot, police officer) have specific vision requirements, most of which can be obtained through laser surgery. It is advisable to consult with not only the surgeon, but with members of the occupation to make sure the requirements are met.

As well as considering the benefits and risks of laser eye surgery, it is important that people are realistic about what they will achieve through the procedure. As people age, so do their eyes, it is possible that in the future some people may need reading glasses or other corrective eyewear again, especially those over the age of 40. There also is the possibility of having to have a second procedure if the right amount of correction is not achieved through the first surgery.

Cost is also a consideration for eye laser surgery. Before considering this option, consult with your health insurance professional to see what they cover. Most health insurance does however cover the costs of contact lenses and/or corrective eyewear. Check your group health insurance and/or individual health insurance plan.

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