# Wednesday, May 14, 2008
                 

Chances are that at some point in your life, you've taken antibiotics to fight a serious infection. Traditionally antibiotics have been very effective in combating illnesses such as pneumonia, meningitis, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases. However, misuse and/or overuse can lead to strains of these diseases becoming resistant, and therefore very hard to treat.

There is global concern now as there is an increased finding in antibiotic resistant forms of bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that up until now were easily treated. This could potentially lead to outbreaks of diseases that have been assumed eradicated, i.e. tuberculosis. As well, these outbreaks will be more difficult to treat, as they will not positively respond to the standard treatment protocols.

A major cause of this resistance can be traced to misuse of antibiotics; as well the unnecessary prevention of infections in people, plants and/or animals. Germs are living organisms that are capable of adapting to their environment, and often will take on the characteristics of other, more potent germs. This means that overuse of products such as antibacterial soaps can end up causing germs that are not very harmful to mutate into germs that are. It is important to realize that germs that become resistant to one antibiotic are likely to become resistant to another antibiotic.

In order to help prevent your body from becoming resistant to antibiotics, it is essential to use them only as prescribed, and exactly as prescribed. Antibiotics are not effective for treating such common ailments as a cold and/or the flu. If you are sick, and not getting better, you must visit your physician to be properly diagnosed and treated. This will usually involve a culture being taken, in order for your condition to be properly identified; this is important as certain viruses will respond better to certain types of antibiotics. If you are prescribed antibiotics, you must take them exactly as prescribed; even if you are feeling better, it is vital that you finish all the pills prescribed. If you do not finish the cycle of antibiotics, it usually will result in only the weak bacteria being killed off, with the stronger bacteria remaining and possibly growing stronger in order to survive. This will possibly result in a more serious illness that is not going to respond as well to antibiotics.

Using anti-bacterial products kills off "good" bacteria. The human body needs to be exposed to bacteria in order for the immune system to effectively be able to combat them. By killing off the "harmless" bacteria, your immune system does not have the chance to develop antibodies, leaving you more at risk for serious illnesses. Washing your hands with soap and water regularly throughout the day is a great way to reduce your exposure to any harmful bacteria. As well, cleaning products that are labeled anti-bacterial have the same result; using normal products such as vinegar and water will leave your house clean and allowing good bacteria to remain. Proper food handling and preparation will ensure that the bacteria responsible for illnesses such as salmonella are destroyed.

It is also important to be current in your vaccinations. This is the most effective way of reducing your risk of becoming ill and ultimately needing antibiotics. Make sure you discuss this with your physician; remember that vaccinations for adults will differ than those for children. If you do have unused antibiotics in your home, do not flush them down the drain; this increases the risk of these drugs going into the water table. Bring them back to your doctor or pharmacy, where they can dispose of them properly. Never share your prescription with anyone, even if they are exhibiting the same symptoms you have as it's important for everyone to be diagnosed by their own doctor.

Using antibiotics in the proper way still remains one of our best options in treating certain infections and diseases. Make sure that you reduce your chances of becoming resistant, so that if and when you do need antibiotics, they will be the most effective. It is also important to see your physician as early as possible when you are ill and suspect that it is not just a common cold or flu; not only will you get better quicker, but you will reduce the risk of those around you by decreasing the contagious period of the virus.

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